Free Delivery & Case Discounts

{{miscUtils.formatProductName(product)}}

This striking trio celebrates a specialised and painstaking kind of farming called Biodynamics. Developed by Rudolf Steiner in the early 19th Century (who is also responsible for the Waldorf education system), biodynamics essentially teaches us to treat vines as the ancients did, following the rhythms of nature and using homeopathic cures, rather than agro-chemicals and pesticides. Eight preparations variously using quartz, yarrow flowers, chamomile blossoms, stinging nettles, oak bark, dandelion blossoms, or valerian flowers are applied to vines and the all-important compost pile. Some of these treatments are encased in animal parts, then buried or hung in trees for months. And the dynamizing? The plants, dung or quartz is stirred into water (ideally rainwater) vigorously, changing direction every time a vortex forms. The remedies are then applied in sync with phases of the moon and planets. Yes, it’s complex, but biodynamics is also spreading like wildfire through the wine world. Grape farmers who give it a try see the vines become more resistant to disease, and winemakers find a special balance in the fruit. Biodynamic wines have the lowest levels of added sulphites, and are better for the planet. See for yourself in three wines: an earthy, light-limbed Pinot Noir from Burgundy named Oka for the horse that plows the vineyard; a serious, suave rich red from Chile; and a perfectly poised Riesling from B.C.’s first biodynamically certified vineyard.

  • Out of Stock
Bio Trio bottle

This striking trio celebrates a specialised and painstaking kind of farming called Biodynamics. Developed by Rudolf Steiner in the early 19th Century (who is also responsible for the Waldorf education system), biodynamics essentially teaches us to treat vines as the ancients did, following the rhythms of nature and using homeopathic cures, rather than agro-chemicals and pesticides.

Eight preparations variously using quartz, yarrow flowers, chamomile blossoms, stinging nettles, oak bark, dandelion blossoms, or valerian flowers are applied to vines and the all-important compost pile. Some of these treatments are encased in animal parts, then buried or hung in trees for months.

And the dynamizing? The plants, dung or quartz is stirred into water (ideally rainwater) vigorously, changing direction every time a vortex forms. The remedies are then applied in sync with phases of the moon and planets. Yes, it’s complex, but biodynamics is also spreading like wildfire through the wine world. Grape farmers who give it a try see the vines become more resistant to disease, and winemakers find a special balance in the fruit. Biodynamic wines have the lowest levels of added sulphites, and are better for the planet. See for yourself in three wines: an earthy, light-limbed Pinot Noir from Burgundy named Oka for the horse that plows the vineyard; a serious, suave rich red from Chile; and a perfectly poised Riesling from B.C.’s first biodynamically certified vineyard.

  • France
  • Chile
  • Kelowna

Items in this pack

{{item.packQuantity}}x

New District

Your browser is out of date!

It looks like you're using an old version of Internet Explorer. For the best experience, please update your browser.

Update Internet Explorer or learn how to browse happy.